Neonicotinoid harms migratory birds

Researchers show for the first time negative effect of Imidacloprid on wild birds Researchers have for the first time shown negative effects of neonicotinoids on the behavior of migratory birds using wild badgers as an example. © Wolfgang Wander / CC-by-sa 3.0 Read out Fatal feed: When songbirds eat seeds treated with pesticides, this affects their traction - and, at worst, even their survival, a study reveals.
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Sunscreen flours heavy metals into the sea

Bathers bring significant amounts of titanium, aluminum and lead into the water Sunscreens are important to our health, but when bathing in the sea, they release potentially harmful metals and chemicals. © FiremanYU / iStock Read out Invisible contamination: A typical bathing day in the Mediterranean can leach significant amounts of heavy metals and nutrients into the sea, a study reveals.
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Himalayas: Skeleton Lake is a mystery

Where did the hundreds of dead on the lake shore come from and why did they die? Hundreds of human skeletons lie on the shores of this lake, which lies high in the Indian Himalayas. When they died and where they came from, researchers have now studied for the first time. © Atish Waghwase Read out Mysterious Deaths: Hundreds of ancient skeletons lie on the shores of Roopkund Lake, high in the Indian Himalayas.
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Researchers discover the largest parrot in the world

Primeval parrot was one meter tall and could have been a carnivore Against him the small sparrow-birds act like ants at his feet: Thus the newly discovered giant-parrot could have looked Heracles inexpectatus during his lifetime. © Brian Choo / Flinders University Read out Spectacular find: Paleontologists have discovered in New Zealand the only and largest giant parrot in the world - as a fossil.
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Asia's oldest fossil forest discovered

370 million years old forest of tree-like rambelly covers 25 hectares For example, the forest of bearded plants now discovered in China may have looked 360 million years ago. © Zhenzhen Deng Read out Spectacular find: In China, paleontologists have discovered the oldest fossil forest in Asia - and the world's largest forest from the Devonian era.
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Unusual primal arthropod discovered

More than 500 million years old fossil dazzled with huge head and sieve legs An enormous head-armor, a ring-shaped, shinguled mouth and two sieve-like forelegs - that's what the great arthropod Cambroraster falcatus might have looked like during his lifetime. © Lars Fields / Royal Ontario Museum Read out Surprisingly different: paleontologists have discovered an unusual representative of the great primal arthropods of the Cambrian.
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Even the Neanderthals used glue

Stone tools were attached to handles with "glue" made of resin and beeswax In order to attach their stone tools to handles, the Neanderthals used glue made from resin, which they heated over the fire. © Randii Oliver / Public domain Read out Sticky Find: Neanderthals already knew some kind of glue.
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A mold as a gold collector

Soil-living Fusarium mushroom enriches gold particles in its mushroom furs The fungus Fusarium oxysporum can accumulate gold from the soil and stores it as gold particles on its fungal filaments, as this electron micrograph shows. © CSIRO Read out Surprising discovery: A mold found in the soil can accumulate gold in its fungal threads, researchers have discovered in Australia.
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Radioactive fallout in the Mariana Trench

Crabs from the bottom of the deep sea trunks have enriched C-14's nuclear weapons tests Explosion of a nuclear bomb in the US nuclear weapons test Castle Bravo 1954 in Bikini Atoll. The fallout of these tests has penetrated surprisingly fast into the deepest deep-sea trenches. © US Department of Energy Read out Astonishingly fast: The fallout of the nuclear weapons tests has already reached the deepest deep-sea trenches - faster than previously thought possible.
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Why were our ancestors cannibals?

For homo antecessor, consuming conspecifics was obviously more rewarding than hunting Early humans of the kind Homo antecessor were cannibals, as finds in Spain occupy. But why? © J. Rodríguez Read out Creepy meal: Just under a million years ago, cannibalism apparently belonged to the everyday lives of our ancestors, as bones in Spain suggest.
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Link of tyrannosaur evolution discovered

92 million-year-old T. rex relative closes crucial gaps in the Dino pedigree 92 million years ago, a tyrannosaur cousin lived in North America, which already possessed crucial features of the T.rex - but in a small format. © Andrey Atuchin Read out Missing Link: A 92-million-year-old fossil gives an insight into a key phase of tyrannosaur evolution.
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Prohibited pesticides in Europe's rivers

Tests in ten countries do not find a single body of water without pesticide contamination Taking a water sample in a canal. In their study, the researchers found no running water that was not contaminated with pesticides. © Jonathan Panduro Findalen / Greenpeace Read out Contaminated Water: The water of European rivers and canals is contaminated with more than a hundred different pesticides - sometimes beyond the limits, as tests in ten countries now reveal.
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World's largest Tyrannosaurus rex discovered

Found in Canada fossil proves to be the heaviest and largest predator dinosaur The skeleton of the tyrannosaur "Scotty": It is the largest and heaviest of all ever-discovered predatory dinosaurs of this species. © Amanda Kelley Read out Primeval Giant: A Tyrannosaurus fossil discovered in Canada is the largest known representative of this species - and the most massive predator dinosaur ever discovered.
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Seabed as a global "seed bank

Deep marine sediments contain quadrillions of long-lived bacterial endospores Deep below the ocean floor, quadrillions of bacteria survive as endospores, recognizable by their bright fluorescence. © Fumio Inagaki / Jamstek Read out Hidden Reservoir: Deep in the ocean floor, there are sixty-four million of endospores - forms of survival of bacteria that can survive enormous periods of time.
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Experiment reconstructs cradle of life

The first life could have originated in alkaline hydrothermal vents of the ancient seas This hydrothermal vent in the Pacific Lost City field spills hydrogen and methane in addition to mineral-rich water - similar vents could have been a cradle of life on the early Earth. © NOAA Ocean Explorer / URI-ILO, UW, IFE Read out Looking back at the primordial soup: Important building blocks for the first life on earth could have arisen at the hydrothermal vents of the oceans.
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Alaska: Mini-Beutler lived between dinosaurs

69 million year old fossil is the northernmost known marsupial relic ever The site of the tiny prehistoric marsupial is the Colville River in Alaska - so far north you have never discovered a marsupial. © Patrick Printmiller Read out Small but tough: In Alaska, paleontologists have discovered the fossil of a 69 million year old marsupial.
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Were Neanderthals "carnivores" after all?

New data speak in favor of a diet without fish, but with a lot of meat from large suckers Hunt for mammoth, reindeer and co: The Neanderthals could have been mainly fed by the meat of large mammals. © Joel Lena / iStock Read out Meat preferred: The diet of Neanderthals could have been more one-sided than previously thought, as suggested by new isotope analyzes.
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A footprint of the last Neanderthal man?

A 29, 000 year old footprint in Gibraltar could have come from a Neanderthal man Does this 29, 000-year-old footprint come from a Neanderthal man? © University of Seville Read out Last track: On the Gibraltar peninsula paleontologists have discovered a fossil footprint that could have come from a Neanderthal man.
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Long-neck Dino with heart in the tail

Titanosaurs discovered in Tanzania has unusual tail bones So could the newly discovered Titqanosaurier Mnyamawamtuka moyowamkia have looked. © Mark Witton Read out "Herziger" Fund: In Tanzania, paleontologists have discovered the fossil of a 100-million-year-old titanosaur. Its peculiarity: The long-necked herbivore had conspicuously heart-shaped tail bones - quasi suitable for Valentine's Day.
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Are these the oldest crawl tracks on earth?

2.1 billion years old traces in the sediment give Pal ontologen R tsel on 2.1 billion years ago, amoeba-like creatures may have left these traces in the sediment. © Abderrazak El Albani Read out Enigmatic discovery: In Gabon, paleontologists have discovered 2.1 billion year old thread-like fossils that do not fit into any scheme.
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