Tyrannosaurus skull was unique

Mobile bone modules made Robbin's skull and snout flexible Terrifying and very special: The skull of the Tyrannosaurus rex is unique in its modular structure. © David Monniaux / CC-by-sa 3.0 Read out Genius patent of nature: The skull of the Tyrannosaurus rex was not only particularly large, it was also unique in its structure, as revealed by an analysis.
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Antarctic: Unusual primal dinosaur fossil discovered

Fossil evidence proves uniqueness of the Antarctic environment 250 million years ago The archosaur Antarctanax shackletoni (front) lurked in the Antarctic 250 million years ago © Adrienne Stroup, Field Museum Read out Lost World: 250 million years ago, the Antarctic hosted a unique wildlife - including an unusual prehistoric lizard.
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Oldest giant predator dinosaur discovered

Fossil discovered in northern Italy proves to be an important link in dinosaur evolution Almost eight meters long and well over a ton: The predator dinosaur Saltriovenator zanellai was a real giant in his lifetime. © Davide Bonadonna, Gabriele Bindellini Read out Sensational find: Paleontologists have discovered in northern Italy the oldest predator of the great predator dinosaurs - the largest carnivore of the early Jurassic.
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Did the Dino ancestors have feathers?

Pterosaur fossils with feathers shed new light on feather evolution Pterosaurs sat already feathers, as evidenced by new fossil finds. Their feathers were still more like hair. © Baoyu Jiang, Michael Benton et al. Read out But no "invention" of the dinosaurs: The pterosaurs already had real feathers - albeit very primitive.
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Siberian "unicorn" survived longer

As recently as 38, 000 years ago, there were prehistoric Nash rners in Eastern Europe and Central Asia The primeval rhino Elasmotherium sibiricum is also known as the Siberian unicorn because of its unusually long horn. © DiBgd / CC-by-sa 3.0 Read out The last of their kind: Even 38, 000 years ago, there were real "unicorns" in the steppes of Siberia and Mongolia - our ancestors might have met them.
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Climate change: More frost damage to trees

The postponed growth period increases the risk of frost for tree species in Central Europe Some tree species in Germany are at risk of frost in the spring. © Dr. Hans-Peter Ende / public domain Read out Paradox effect: Due to global warming, trees in Central Europe are already suffering more from frost damage, a study reveals.
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Rich life in the "cellar of the earth

Biomass below the Earth's surface exceeds humanity by more than a hundredfold These nematodes were discovered 4.4 kilometers deep below the surface of the earth - they are true extremists of life. © Gaetan Borgony / Extreme Life Isyensya Read out Hidden lifeworld: Deep below the surface of the earth live far more organisms than previously thought - their biodiversity could even surpass the aboveground life, as a balance of the Deep Carbon Observatory reveals.
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Urerde: Oxygen before the first blue-green algae?

Photo-protein already produced 3.5 billion years ago oxygen Even a billion years before the first Cyamnobacteria, microbes could have produced oxygen. © undefined / iStock Read out Surprisingly early: About one billion years before the first cyanobacteria, primitive microbes could have produced oxygen.
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Cod becomes a climate refugee

Large loss of spawning areas in the North Atlantic at more than 1.5 degrees warming Even with moderate climate change, cod and polar cod (picture) have to dodge north into colder waters - otherwise their spawn will die. © Hauke ​​Flores / AW Read out Escape or death: If climate change continues, it will be tight for the cod - one of our most important edible fish. Eve
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Pesticide cocktail in Europe's soils

Residues of numerous pesticides pollute our cker Read out Heavily polluted: Arable land in Europe is often contaminated with pesticides. As revealed by an analysis from several EU countries, 80 percent of the soil samples now contain residues of these potentially toxic substances. It is often possible to detect a whole pesticide cocktail in the soil right away
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How we change our planet

Map shows man-made changes in the world's land areas Example America: How has man changed the country here? © Tomasz Stepinski / UC Read out Visible change: Humans change the earth sustainably - how much, researchers have now made visible. Their satellite-based map documents global changes in land use.
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Pterosaur had a coat

New fossil analyzes rehabilitate pioneer of paloontology The first specimen of the pterodactyl Scaphognathus crassirostris: Did he have a coat or not? © Goldfoot Museum University of Bonn / https://palaeo-electronica.org Read out He was right: New investigations have confirmed an old suspicion: The long-tailed pterodactyl species Scaphognathus crassirostris actually had a kind of coat.
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Insects: Sterile due to heat waves?

Even a heat wave drastically lowers the sperm count in caterpillars Even a heat wave is enough to drastically reduce the fertility of beetles - and that could also apply to other insects. © USDA Read out Devastating effect: Heat waves could do more harm to insects and other invertebrates than previously thought.
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Oldest animal tracks of the Grand Canyon discovered

310 million year old prints are among the earliest reptile traces in the world These 310-million-year-old footprints on a boulder from the Grand Canyon are from a prehistoric reptile. Stephen Rowland Read out Spectacular incidental discovery: During a hike, a geologist discovered the oldest animal tracks in the Grand Canyon
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Cocoa already 5,300 years ago

Archaeologists are discovering the earliest evidence of domestication and use of the cocoa plant Cocoa beans and cocoa powder: The domestication of the cocoa tree, we owe apparently a culture in the Amazon. © Yelena Yemchuk / iStock Read out Surprising find: Archaeologists have discovered the oldest evidence for the preparation of cocoa in the New World.
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New Archeopteryx species identified

"Phantom Fossil" turns out to be the youngest and most birdlike Archeopteryx to date Fossil of the so-called Daiting specimen of Archeopteryx - this has now turned out to be a separate species. © H. Raab / CC-by-sa 3.0 Read out Primitive bird tribe is growing: paleontologists have identified a new species of the famous Archeopteryx.
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Primeval "Piranha" discovered

150 million year old fish fossil is the oldest "meatless" bone fish For example, Piranhamesodon pinnatomus, the primeval "piranha", may have been around 150 million years ago. Jura Museum Eichst tt Read out Remarkable find: Researchers have discovered the 150-million-year-old fossil of a piranha-like prehistoric fish
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Chemical shield for monuments

Transparent coating protects against acid rain and bacteria An invisible coating could protect valuable cultural monuments like the Coliseum in Rome. © Bert Kaufmann / CC-by-sa 2.0 Read out Invisible Protective Layer: Researchers have developed a coating that could protect natural stone structures from deterioration.
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The supposedly oldest fossils are not

The oldest traces of life in the world could only be geological formations These conical structures were supposed to be deposits of the first great microbes - but now new discoveries raise doubts. This rock formation from the Isua greenstone in Greenland is about 3.8 billion years old. © Abigail Allwoo Read out But no traces of life?
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Tasmania: "Lost World" in the deep sea

Newly discovered chain of volcanic seamounts turns out to be a hotspot of marine life Topographical map of some of the seamounts newly discovered off Tasmania © CSIRO Read out Hidden World: Off the coast of Tasmania, researchers have discovered a whole chain of previously unknown sub-volcanoes. The approximately 3, 000 meter high seamounts rise from the bottom of the deep sea and harbor an amazing variety of marine life.
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