Puzzle Fossil is the oldest animal in the world

Already 558 million years ago, the first multicellular animals lived in the primeval sea That's how Dickinsonia - the oldest known animal - could have looked 558 million years ago. © Australian National University Read out Spectacular find: In Russia, paleontologists have discovered the world's oldest animal fossil - and solved the mystery of one of the most bizarre beings in the history of the earth.
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Blue algae live without light

Researchers find first living cyanobacteria in 613 meters of deep rock The purple and red spots indicate active cyanobacteria in the rock drill sample © PNAS Read out Survival despite darkness: Actually, cyanobacteria need sunlight to survive - like other plants too. But now researchers have discovered in a deep well in Spain viable blue-green algae even at a good 600 meters depth.
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Ig Nobel Prizes 2018 awarded

Roller coaster against kidney stones, cannibals and voodoo against the boss The Ig Nobel Prize is meant to make you laugh, then think. © Improbable Research Read out First laugh, then think: Yesterday evening, this year's Ig Nobel Prizes were awarded - the award for bizarre, funny, yet serious research.
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Deep-sea mining leaves deep scars

Massive species loss still detected 26 years after a degradation test Research on the seabed, For the sensitive wildlife of the deep sea, deep-sea mining would be fatal, as a long-term project confirmed. © NOAA / Windows to the Deep Read out Ecological long-term consequences: The mining of raw materials in the deep sea has long-lasting consequences, as a long-term study has now confirmed.
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Child of two human species

Fingerknochen comes from the daughter of a Neanderthal woman and a Denisova man This bone fragment comes from the daughter of a Neanderthal mother and a Denisovan father. © T. Higham / University of Oxford Read out Spectacular discovery: A girl who died 50, 000 years ago in Siberia had parents from two different human species, as now revealed by DNA analysis.
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Deep-sea mining: danger for whales?

Ridiculous impressions in the mining area could come from deep-diving sea creatures. Will deep-sea mining pose a threat to deep-diving beaked whales? © NOAA OER / 2016 Deepwater Exploration of the Mariana Islands Read out Mysterious Traces: Researchers have made a startling discovery in the Pacific Deepwater Mining License.
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Solved puzzles about Santorini disaster

Volcano erupted in the 16th century BC The island of Nea Kameni (in the foreground) is today in the middle of the old caldera of the Santorini volcano © Stug / sandbox / CC-by-sa 3.0 Read out Exactly dated: researchers have clarified when the devastating eruption of the Santorini volcano really happened.
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Monsoon remobilises environmental toxins

Indian monsoon today releases banned contaminants from contaminated soils India in the monsoon rains. The annual rain promotes the release of old pollutants from the soil. © Rajarshi MITRA / CC-by-sa 2.0 Read out Toxic Legacy: Every year, larger amounts of long-banned environmental toxins enter the atmosphere via Asia.
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Elder pterosaur discovered

200-million-year-old fossil sheds new light on the beginnings of pterosaurs Amazingly well received: In Utah researchers have discovered one of the oldest known pterosaurs. © BYU Photo Read out Spectacular find: Paleontologists have discovered in the US the oldest and best preserved fossil of a pterosaur.
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Sunken Stone Age settlement discovered

Archaeologists unearth traces of human settlement from Lake Finland At the bottom of this Finnish lake are traces of a Stone Age settlement. Jesse Jokinen / Museovirasto Read out Underwater Fund: Archologists have discovered traces of a sunken Stone Age settlement in Finland. At the bottom of a lake in the southeast of the country, they discovered, among other things, remnants of a man-made hearth and quartz particles, which indicate a processing of this mineral
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Vikings had monopoly on ivory

Stop trading could explain the disappearance of northern men from Greenland Viking ship off the coast of Greenland - from 985 the Northmen settled on Greenland. © Historisch / Jens Erik Carl Rasmussen Read out Lucrative source of income: The Vikings in Greenland acted with walrus tusks - and apparently took a long time in this business a monopoly position.
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Trees suffer from the heatwave

Drought threatens native tree species Many trees are also suffering from the current heat wave. © Ugurhan / iStock Read out Trees under stress: The heat period makes it difficult for many trees native to Germany. Especially sensitive large-leaved species and young urban trees are currently in acute danger, as researchers report.
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Record temperatures in the North and Baltic Seas

Heat wave promotes harmful algal blooms, bacterial proliferation and "death zones" Very nice and warm: on the Baltic Sea coast there are currently conditions as on the Mediterranean. © Mije_shots / istock Read out Heated up: The temperatures of the North and Baltic Seas peaked in July. As current data show, the Baltic Sea even set a new record with an average surface temperature of 20 degrees Celsius.
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Microplastic heats the earth

Disintegrating plastic parts release greenhouse gases such as methane More and more plastic pollutes the environment - and apparently also releases greenhouse gases during its decomposition. © Sarah-Jeanne Royer Read out Disintegration with Side Effects: Microplastics may be an even bigger environmental problem than previously known.
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Solved puzzles about primal vertebrates

Early vertebrates shed new light on the evolution of our skeleton The today extinct heterostraci belong to the oldest known vertebrates. © Nobu Tamura / CC-by-sa 4.0 Read out Illuminated: Researchers have cast a glance inside our oldest vertebrate relatives. Their X-ray analyzes show that the skeleton of these early, fish-like vertebrates consisted of aspidin - a tissue that used to be the precursor of mineralized skeletal structures.
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Earth overload day: From now on we live on pump

Humanity has used up all sustainable resources for 2018 In 2018, the earth overload day will be on the 1st of August - mankind would need 1.7 earths to cover their resource consumption. © NASA / freeimages Read out From the 1st of August we would need a second earth. For to this day, humanity has used up all sustainable resources for this year.
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Algae as mercury storage

Microorganisms accumulate enormous amounts of heavy metal in the seabed Diatoms apparently store large amounts of mercury. © Elif Bayraktar / istock Read out Giant storage: Marine sediments in the Antarctic are heavily contaminated with mercury. Researchers have found that the toxic heavy metal is ingested in large quantities by tiny algae - and eventually ends up in the ocean floor with the remains of these organisms.
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Pseudo-journals on the rise

More than 5, 000 German researchers have already published in Predatory Journals Profit instead of peer review: Predatory journals undermine the quality assurance of science © Maksim Koval / thinkstock Read out Imagined seriousness: More and more scientists are pseudo-scientific specialist journals on the glue - at least 400, 000 are said to be affected, 5, 000 of them in Germany.
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Climate change threatens salt marshes

Unique coastal areas could disappear due to sea-level rise Between land and sea: salt marsh on Spiekerooger Inselwatt © Jürgen Howaldt / CC-by-sa 2.0 Read out Acutely endangered: Climatic changes in the sea level could mean the end of a unique ecosystem between land and ocean - the salt marsh. As a study shows, such coastal areas threaten to be wetted by rising water levels.
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Discovered the oldest intact pigments

Researchers find chlorophyll relics in 1.1 billion year old rocks The colors of the pigments range from blood red to dark purple - and appear pink when diluted. © Australia National University Read out Ancient colors: Researchers have discovered the oldest intact pigments to date. The 1.1-billion-year-old colors of marine sediments are what are known as porphyrins: substances that are found, inter alia, in the photo pigment chlorophyll.
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