Saxony-Anhalt: Heavy Metal Leaks in Toxic Mud Pit

Mercury, radium and other toxic heavy metals leak into the groundwater Brüchau is located in the gas field Altmark, the second largest in continental Europe © LBEG Niedersachsen Read out Poison in groundwater: In Saxony-Anhalt, poisonous heavy metals apparently escape from toxic sludge into groundwater, including mercury and radium.
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A formula against the power failure

Looking for weak points in the power grid is going to be faster and easier in the future A formula could help to protect the power grid from failures. © Nathan Sudds / freeimages Read out Math scores risk points: Researchers have developed a formula that can improve predictions of power outages. Because it provides in no time reliable values ​​about whether a particular power line is critical or not. As
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Deepwater Horizon - five years later

The consequences of the oil catastrophe in the Gulf of Mexico can still be felt today Deepwater Horizon after the Blow Out of the Well on April 20, 2010 © US Coast Guard Read out Consequences to date: When the Deepwater Horizon oil rig exploded in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, it started the worst oil disaster in history.
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Fukushima - four years later

Leaks, tanks and ghost towns - the consequences of the disaster are far from under control View of Fukushima Daiichi, in the foreground a barrier made of sheet piles in the sea. © TEPCO Read out Fukushima and no end: Four years after the nuclear disaster at the Japanese nuclear power plant Fukushima Daiichi continue the problems of the radiant ruin on.
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East Germany shines brighter

Nightly light emission per inhabitant is higher in the east than in the west Illuminated city centers: Differences between the light sources in the large metropolitan areas prevail worldwide. © Craig Mayhew, Robert Simmon / NASA GSFC Read out Because of "dark Germany": East Germany shines brighter than the west at night.
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Climate summit ends disappointing

Delegates could not agree on a draft agreement at the 2014 Climate Change Conference CO2 emissions are still rising unabated, amounting to around 10 GtC per year. © SXC Read out Decision postponed: Only a weak compromise is the result of this year's climate summit. Many environmental organizations are disappointed - what should serve as a blueprint for the next year's global climate agreement is simply an invitation to all states to submit their own plans.
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Poor climate balance for bioenergy

Cultivation of organic resources requires too much land and requires climate-damaging fertilizers Because of climate protection: Gaining bioenergy from rapeseed and other plants rarely contributes to the stabilization of the climate. © MPI for Biogeochemistry / Ernst-Detlef Schulze Read out Climate protection is not everywhere where climate protection is on the agenda: bioenergy does not have a climate-friendly effect on closer inspection - rather the opposite.
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CO2 emissions accurately mapped to the building

Three-dimensional maps show major sources of greenhouse gases in the city This three-dimensional map of the Hestia system shows the CO2 emissions in the US city of Indianapolis down to individual buildings and streets exactly, the colors indicate the type of emission source. © Bedrich Benes, Michel Abdul-Massih Read out US researchers have for the first time developed a system that can display greenhouse gas emissions even from individual buildings and roads.
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Wind power can cover the world's energy needs several times

Airflows produced 250 terawatts of electricity without any problems Bangui Wind Farm, Ilocos Norte, Philippines © John Ryan Cordova / CC BY-SA 2.0 Read out The wind provides enough energy to meet the multiple needs of our entire civilization. Even if you set up wind turbines only on land and in offshore marine areas, they could produce 80 terawatts of electricity worldwide before they get in each other's way.
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Radioactive water from Fukushima has crossed half pacific

Remains of contamination will reach the coast of the USA in three years Distribution of radioactive cesium-137 in the water of the Pacific 16 months after the nuclear accident of Fukushima in March 2011; bluish hues indicate areas of high dilution. © GEOMAR / Erik Behrens, Franziska Schwarzkopf, Joke Lübbecke and Claus Böning Read out Ocean currents continue to drive the seawater polluted in March 2011 in Fukushima towards North America. A
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Climate change could endanger electricity production

Lack of water and warm rivers force power plants more often for throttling Nuclear Power Plant Biblis © CC-by-sa 2.0 Read out Climate change could severely disrupt power generation in Europe and the US in the future. In just over 20 years, the days will be piling up when the power plants have to be throttled or shut down because they can no longer be sufficiently cooled due to high water temperatures of the rivers and low water levels.
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Large wind farms change the local climate

Turbulence through the rotors leads to higher night temperatures Wind turbine © DOE Read out Large wind turbines change the climate in their environment: Especially at night it is over and in the wind farms much warmer than on more remote areas. This has been determined by US researchers using satellite data.
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2011: Less greenhouse gases despite less nuclear energy

Greenhouse gas emissions fell by two percent compared to 2010 Read out Germany's greenhouse gas emissions in 2011 fell by two percent compared to the previous year. And this despite the positive economic development and the shutdown of eight nuclear power plants. This is shown by current calculations by the Federal Environment Agency (UBA)
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Expedition explores consequences of manganese nodule extraction

Research in manganese nodule license area in Central Pacific Manganese nodules. © BGR Read out Marine researchers from the Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR) set out on 29 March 2012 for an expedition to the Central Pacific. Their goal: the Manganknollengürtel between Hawaii and Mexico.
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Fukushima report reveals mayhem after the disaster

Operators and authorities surprisingly unprepared at all levels Read out Human error, ignorance and serious communication errors led to the nuclear disaster in Fukushima, Japan just over a year ago. This is the conclusion of an independent commission of inquiry, which has analyzed the exact processes after the severe earthquake and tsunami of 11 March 2011
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Fukushima is threatening a new earthquake

Faults under the damaged kiln active again Map of Japan with the epicenter of the quake of March 11, 2011 (pink), the Iwaki quake of April 11 (red star), the location of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (red square) and other quakes in the region (black) ; Also marked are the plate borders in the region
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Clean coal combustion also influences the climate

Exhaust gas purification produces aerosols that promote heavy rain Coal Power Plant © BMU, H.-G.Oed Read out Modern coal-fired power plants extract sulfur and nitrogen from their exhaust gases, but this has a climate-relevant side effect: cleaning leads to a multiplication of the emissions of ultrafine particles.
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Gas reservoir proves to be a safe CO2 storage

World's largest pilot project ran without leaks and groundwater damage This rig at the Otway CCS pilot plant in Australia drilled the 2, 249-meter-deep access that later injected CO2 into the subsoil. © CO2CRC Read out In disused natural gas deposits, the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2) can also be safely stored in large quantities.
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Greenhouse gas emissions reached a new record high in 2010

World economic crisis led only to short-term decrease in CO2 emissions Read out Global greenhouse gas emissions reached a new record in 2010: for the first time in history, more than nine billion tonnes of carbon dioxide (CO2) was released into the atmosphere in just one year through the burning of fossil fuels and the cement industry
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Jet Streams: Fast wind with little power

Beams of the upper atmosphere deliver less renewable energy than previously thought Like dragons with rotors, windmills are supposed to hang in the atmosphere layers where the jet streams blow. The photomontage illustrates how this could be technically implemented. © Lee Miller Read out The energy mix of the future must probably be different in composition than some visionaries imagine.
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