Sustainable products are very much in vogue

household consumption Product sustainability is becoming more and more important to consumers - but what can be done in this context? © Jason Blackeye / Unsplash.com Read out The numbers at a glance Information on the proportion of organic and sustainable products in the total consumption of German households can only be estimated.
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Artificial intelligence is suitable for monitoring volcanoes

Helmholtz Center Potsdam GFZ German Research Center for Geosciences Read out More than half of Earth's active volcanoes are not instrumentally monitored. For example, outbreaks can occur that could at least theoretically warn people without triggering an alarm. Researchers from the Technical University Berlin and the German Research Center for Geosciences GFZ in Potsdam have now created the MOUNTS volcano monitoring platform, which brings together various measurement data and analyzes satellite imagery using, among other things, 'machine learning'
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No stress in the Christmas season through timely preparation

self-management Christmas shopping © iStock.com, iJeab Read out The stress in the Christmas time really does not have to be. There are things that can be done well in advance. So it makes sense to use current offers for wine and sparkling wine. Anyone who has become acquainted with new wines during wine tasting will immediately seize the opportunity to buy red wine and sparkling wine for Christmas.
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Alexander von Humboldt

geoscientific Alexander von Humboldt 1859 Julius Schrader / public domain Read out Alexander von Humboldt © Foundation Prussian Palaces and Gardens Berlin-Brandenburg (portrait) Alexander von Humboldt An all-rounder looking for answers He toured South America, crossed Central Asia and knew Europe from the crater rim of Mount Vesuvius to the bottom of the Thames: Alexander von Humboldt is regarded as Germany's best-known universal scholar.
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The MOSAiC expedition

geoscientific Melting temple on Arctic sea ice. Stefan Hendricks / AWI Read out Frozen in the ice, the "Polarstern" and their crew will drift through the central Arctic for a year collecting data from this white patch of the research map. © Stefan Hendricks / AWI MOSAiC Expedition: A year in the ice International transpolar drift through the central Arctic begins It is the largest Arctic expedition ever: on September 20, 2019, an international team of researchers set off with the research icebreaker Polarstern for a one-year drift through the Arctic Ocean.
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Environmental protection: That's why it's important to take responsibility

sustainability Today everybody has a responsibility towards the environment. Even the most minimal rethinking can make a difference. Fotolia, masterart2680 Read out In 1994, environmental protection was included as a state goal in the form of Article 20a in the German Basic Law. To date, tough debates and discussions have taken place
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air pollution

geoscientific Ozone smog over Los Angeles. Daniel Stein / iStock Read out There is thick air but where does the air pollutants come from and how do you best measure them? studioflara / iStock There is something in the air On the trail of fine dust, nitrogen oxides and Co Air pollution and limits have become political explosives
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Climate history in the ice

Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Center for Polar and Marine Research Read out Researchers from 14 institutions in ten European countries searched the Antarctic ice for three years for a place to study the climate history of the last 1.5 million years. The consortium Beyond EPICA Oldest Ice (BE-OI) under the leadership of Olaf Eisen from the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Center for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) in Bremerhaven recently reported the results presented at a conference of the "European Geosciences Union" in Vienna
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Project PermaSense

geoscientific ETH researcher Jan Beutel doing maintenance work on the sensor network on the Matterhorn. ETH Z rich / PermaSense Read out View of the Matterhorn. A sensor network at this mountain peak has provided unique data for ten years. © Jackph / Public domain Data treasure from the Matterhorn Sensor measuring network provides insight into permafrost and rockfall Unique measurement campaign: For ten years, a wireless sensor network on the Hörnligrat on the Matterhorn has provided continuous measurement data on the condition of rocks, permafrost and the climate.
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Jamnaja - Rider from the steppe

geoscientific String pottery, ax and amber discs (left) and weapon spikes made of bones and bronze of the Jamnaja. Danish National Museum, Mustafin / Public domain Read out Part of our cultural and genetic heritage is due to Jamnaja - a semi-nomadic steppe people that existed 5, 000 years ago. © Dmitri Chulov / iStock Heir of the steppe riders How a Bronze Age people changed our story In the Bronze Age, our ancestors experienced a tremendous cultural boost.
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Heir of the steppe riders

How a Bronze Age people changed our history Part of our cultural and genetic heritage is due to the Jamnaja, a semi-nomadic steppe people that existed 5, 000 years ago. Dmitri Chulov / iStock Read out In the Bronze Age, our ancestors experienced a tremendous cultural boost. Suddenly they changed their crafting techniques, discovered the nuclear family and property, and buried their dead in new ways
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There is something in the air

On the trail of fine dust, nitrogen oxides and Co There is thick air but where does the air pollutants come from and how do you best measure them? studioflara / iStock Read out Air pollution and limits have become political explosives. But what is actually good air - and where do pollutants such as nitrogen oxides, ozone or particulate matter come from
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Super flashes surprise researchers

Extremely strong lightning hangs in the winter and over the sea why is puzzling Super flashes are a thousand times stronger than normal discharges - and their temporal and spatial distribution are puzzles. © boschettophotography / iStock Read out Puzzling Weather Phenomenon: Super flashes are rare, but a thousand times stronger than normal thunderstorm discharges - and surprisingly different, as revealed by the first mapping of this phenomenon.
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A new dino with duckbill

72-million-year-old hadrosaur is the largest dino skeleton ever found in Japan This is what Kamuysaurus japonicus might have looked like. © Kobayashi et al., 2019 / Scientific Reports Read out New family member: Researchers in Japan have discovered the 72-million-year-old fossil of a previously unknown hadrosaur species.
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Arctic: Sea ice continues to shrink

The summery area of ​​Arctic sea ice is the second smallest since the beginning of the measurement Research icebreaker Polarstern in thin ice: The Arctic sea ice has in September 2019 the second smallest extent since the beginning of the measurements. © Stefanie Arndt Read out Scarcely past the negative record: the Arctic sea ice once again reaches a summer low. Wit
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Discovered oldest crawls?

The 550-million-year-old find already documents the existence of mobile animals in the Ediacarium Researchers have discovered a 550-million-year-old prehistoric creature along with its creep - a special find. © Virginia Tech College of Science Read out Primeval Traces of Motion: Researchers in China have discovered the 550-million-year-old fossil of a primitive animal - along with its creeping traces.
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The day the dinos died

Drill core from Chicxulub Crater revealed first 24 hours after the asteroid impact Much of the dinosaurs may have died 66 million years ago on the first day after the impact of the Chicxulub asteroid. © serpeblu / iStock Read out Deadly day: Researchers first reconstructed what happened in the first 24 hours after the impact of the "Dinokiller" asteroid 66 million years ago.
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Foundation stone discovered by Neuschwanstein

Modern forensic technology unlocks the mystery of the location of the foundation stone in the King's Castle 150 years ago, Ludwig II laid the foundation stone for Neuschwanstein Castle. © Rudy Balasko / istock Read out Exciting discovery: 150 years ago the foundation stone was laid for the famous fairytale castle Neuschwanstein - now researchers have rediscovered this stone in the walls.
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Will the banana get too hot?

Climate change could lead to lower yields in important crops How does climate change affect banana crops? © skodonnell / istock Read out Tropical fruits in trouble: Climate change could lead to significant crop losses in some banana-growing areas. As a forecast shows, it is just too hot and dry for the fruits of the world's largest producer India and in the important producer country of Brazil.
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Climate change shifts vintage

Grape harvesting in Burgundy now begins 13 days earlier than was customary for centuries Harvesting starts earlier and earlier - a consequence of climate change © Esperanza33 / istock Read out Premature Grapes: Climate change is already having a noticeable effect on the grape harvest. According to historical data from Burgundy, winemakers have started harvesting an average of 13 days earlier than was customary for centuries before in the last 30 years.
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