Oldest high mountain settlement discovered

People settled in the high mountains of Ethiopia 40, 000 years ago Today, the Bale Mountains in Ethiopia are glacier-free - but 40, 000 years ago it was different. G tz Ossendorf Read out Extreme habitat: In Ethiopia, researchers have discovered the oldest traces of a high mountain settlement so far
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Jerusalem: Relics of the Babylonian conquest discovered

Ashes, arrowheads and everyday objects bear witness to the historical-biblical event This 2, 500-year-old arrowhead was found in an ash layer in Jerusalem. It is Scythian style and could therefore come from the Babylonian conquerors of the city. © Mt Zion Archaeological Expedition / Virginia Withers Read out Archaeologists have found evidence of the conquest of Jerusalem by the Babylonians - an event already described in the Bible.
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Pole reversal: Gradually instead of abruptly?

Last magnetic field reversal could have taken 22, 000 years The next pole reversal of the Earth's magnetic field is determined. But how quickly such a polarity reversal has been controversial so far. © Petrovich9 / iStock Read out Long chaos: The polarity reversal of the Earth's magnetic field is apparently slower and erratic than previously thought - this could also apply to a future pole reversal.
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Sea level: accelerated increase since 1960

Researchers determine the beginning and cause of the ever-increasing level increases Sea levels are not only steadily increasing, their rise is also accelerating. © Moorefam / iStock Read out Earlier than expected, global sea level rise picked up earlier than previously thought. New evaluations prove that the levels have been rising ever faster since the 1960s.
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Most accurate map of Antarctic ice streams

New map shows ice movements ten times more accurate and far more comprehensive than previous ones While glaciers near the coast, such as the Ferrar glacier, are relatively well mapped, this does not apply to the Antarctic interior. Now, a new map shows ice movements much more precisely than before. © Eli Duke / CC-by-sa 2.
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Volcanoes: Where does the next vent open?

New model predicts location of future outbreaks High-risk zone: View of the caldera of the super-volcano Campi Flegrei near Naples. Where in this volcanic area the next lava outbreak could take place now predicts a new model. © Giuseppe Vilardo / INGV-OV GeoLab Read out Risk limited: A new model can predict where the next lava exit will take place at a volcano - a challenge that has so far been difficult to achieve.
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Climate change: unprecedented coherence

No climate change of the last 2, 000 years was globally as synchronous as the current warming The current warming affects 98 percent of the Earth's surface - it is thus as comprehensive and consistent as no other climate change of the last 2, 000 years. © bischy / thinkstock Read out Global instead of regional: the pattern of current warming is unique in the last 2, 000 years, as revealed by two studies.
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First monument to a vanished glacier

"Letter to the Future" commemorates Iceland's first officially "dead" glacier That's what he looked like: the Okjökull glacier on Iceland has officially not been a glacier since 2014. He has melted down so much that only a dead ice remains. © Dominic Boyer / Cymene Howe Read out Memorial to posterity: The first commemorative plaque for a vanished glacier will soon be unveiled on Iceland.
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Slavic warrior in the Viking grave?

Ax of Slavic origin in a thousand-year-old female grave gives R tsel This ax comes from a Viking grave on Langeland where a woman was buried - was she a Slav warrior? © Mira Fricke Read out Did she come from Poland? On the Danish island of Langeland, archaeologists have discovered the grave of a Viking woman who was buried with a war ax.
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From today we would need a second earth

For the first time, the worldwide earth overload day is well into July The resource hunger of mankind now requires 1.75 earths. © NASA Read out From today we live on pump: Today, July 29, humanity has used up all the sustainable resources of our planet for the year 2019. The earth congestion day has thus moved forward by a few days and is now in July for the first time, according to the Global Footprint Network.
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Shipwreck discovered from the time of Columbus

Even after 500 years at the bottom of the Baltic Sea, the wreck is almost completely intact This ship wreck on the Age of Discovery survived 500 years at the bottom of the Baltic Sea almost intact. © Deep Sea Productions / MMT Read out Sensational find: Archaeologists have discovered a nearly intact shipwreck from the time of Christopher Columbus off the coast of Sweden - a unique find.
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Impact relics discovered in shells

Two to three million years ago, a meteorite could have hit Florida These tiny beads of rock-glass discovered a researcher inside shells. They testify that two to three million could have hit a Florida meteorite. © Kristen Grace / Florida Museum Read out Unusual find: Inside the fossil shells researchers have discovered evidence for a previously unknown meteorite impact in Florida.
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June 2019 sets new heat record

Last month was warmest in the world and also in Germany since the beginning of the recordings Deviations of the temperatures in June 2019 from the long-term monthly average (red = warmer, blue = colder) © NOAA Read out The warming continues: June 2019 was the warmest month since the beginning of the weather records worldwide and in many countries of the world.
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Stonehenge: stone transport with pork fat?

Builders may have used tallow as a lubricant for transport carriages Stonehenge is an impressive megalithic structure - but there are still many questions left to its origins. © narvikk / istock Read out Stone Age Lubricant: Lard could have facilitated the transport of Stonehenge's massive stones.
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The earth's core is "leaking

For 2.5 billion years, nuclear material is constantly entering the earth's mantle For 2.5 billion years, nuclear material has passed into the Earth's mantle, as an isotope study suggests. © Johannes Gerhardus Swanepoel / thinkstock Read out Creeping diffusion: The Earth's core appears to have been leaking for around 2.
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Discovered relics of the First Crusade

Archaeological finds confirm the tradition of the conquest of Jerusalem by the crusaders Crusaders at the gates of Jerusalem (French representation of 1270) © gemeinfrei Read out In the name of God: During the First Crusade, Jerusalem was cruelly conquered by a Crusader army. Archaeologists have now discovered exciting relics of this siege nearly a thousand years ago.
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Triceratops relative ran on two legs

Previously hanged dinosaurs provide new insights into the evolution of four-legged gangs The Auroraceratops is an early relative of the Triceratops, unlike this but he ran on two legs. © Robert Walters Read out Still two-legged: Researchers have examined fossils of an early Triceratops relatives - with exciting results.
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Earliest letter from a Christian

Letter from the year 230 gives insights into the life of the early Christians in the Roman gypten The last line of this papyrus from around 230 AD contains a Christian salutation. This makes this text the oldest Christian letter worldwide. © University of Basel Read out Unique rarity: Researchers have tracked down the oldest known letter of a Christian - it dates from the time around 230 AD, as confirmed by dates.
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Apollo 11 samples: priceless souvenirs

The first lunar and some surprises First look at real moon rock: samples of the Apollo 11 mission right after landing. © NASA Read out From the Moon to Mainz: 50 years ago, Apollo 11 was the first astronaut to land on the moon. On their return, they brought priceless souvenirs - 21 kilograms of moon rock.
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Archaeologists discover Stone Age metropolis

9, 000 year old city in Israel had up to 3, 000 inhabitants 40 hectares and astonishingly modern: View of the remains of the Stone Age city discovered near Jerusalem. © Eyal Marco / Israel Antiquities Authority Read out Older than Stonehenge and the Pyramids: Not far from Jerusalem, archaeologists have discovered a surprisingly large and progressive Stone Age city.
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