Elder Homo sapiens of Europe discovered

210, 000 years old skull from Greece is the earliest modern man outside Africa This partially preserved skull is Europe's oldest homo sapiens fossil. © Katerina Harvati / University of Tübingen Read out Spectacular discovery: A fossil from Greece is the oldest homo sapiens find outside Africa. The skull is already 210, 000 years old and thus by far the earliest evidence of a colonization of Europe by our human species.
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Enlightened murder from the Stone Age

The former Europeans were victims of violence 33, 000 years ago Two brutal blows to the head probably sealed the fate of this early European. © Kranoti et al, 2019 Read out Brutally Murdered: Researchers have revealed a 33, 000-year-old death as a murder. Her analysis of the skull injury of an early European from Romania shows: This man got two targeted blows with a club on the head during his lifetime - and died in all likelihood.
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Do Trump authorities censor their researchers?

Press releases on climate change studies are suppressed or rewritten US authorities appear to be increasingly hindering the publication of study results on climate change and its consequences © Eric Falco / iStock Read out Muzzling for researchers: The climate-skeptical attitude of the US government is now also influencing the science communication, as reports suggest.
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Istanbul: Acute earthquake hazard confirmed

Tension under the Sea of ​​Marmara suffices for a quake of magnitude 7.1 to 7.4 Istanbul is seismically in an ejection seat. How high the tension on the North Anatolian Fault right in front of the city, researchers have now determined. © gece33 / iStock Read out Pent-up voltage: A new measuring system confirms the acute earthquake danger for the metropolis Istanbul - and quantifies it for the first time. The
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Intact Viking boat grave discovered

Tomb of a Viking with grave goods is only the tenth boat grave in Sweden View of the thousand year old boat grave (left), to the grave goods included a shield and a decorated comb. © Arkeologerna Read out Rare find: Archaeologists have discovered an intact boat grave from the time of the Vikings in the Swedish town of Uppsala.
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Where did the Philistines come from?

DNA analyzes show that ancestors of the biblical people came from Europe Excavations of the bones of a dead Philistine - a member of the people, to whom the biblical giant Goliath belonged. © Melissa Aja / Leon Levy Expedition to Ashkelon Read out Goliath had European roots: researchers could have solved the mystery of the origin of the Philistines - the people mentioned in the Bible as the adversary of the Israelites.
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Lava lake discovered on subantarctic island

Glowing lava on Saunders Island is only the eighth lava lake in the world Thermal satellite image of the lava lake in the crater of Mount Michael on Saunders Island, a remote volcanic island in the Southern Ocean. © NASA / Landsat Read out Sizzling lava surrounded by ice: researchers discovered a glowing lava lake on a volcanic island in the Southern Pole - only the eighth worldwide.
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New forests as climate saver?

Afforestation of 900 million hectares of forest could swallow two thirds of CO2 emissions Forests are important CO2 killers - and there is enough space on earth to reforest 900 million hectares of forest. © Xurzon / iStock Read out Space enough: Worldwide, about 0.9 billion hectares of land could be reforested to new forests - without having to give way to fields or settlements, as a study reveals.
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Dead Sea: Mystery of the "salt fingers" solved

Salt crystal growth at the bottom of the Dead Sea is only apparently contradictory to physics In the Dead Sea, thick layers of salt crystals form not only on the edge, but, strangely, in the middle of the sea as well - how and why, researchers have only now found out. © David Leshem / iStock Read out Physical mystery: Actually, the growing salt-crystal formations at the bottom of the Dead Sea are unlikely to exist - because their formation is physically only partially explainable.
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USA: Ecosystems have shifted

Egkoregimes the Great Plains have wandered up to 590 kilometers to the north The Great Plains form a north-south stripe in the center of the USA. Here, the ecosystems have shifted strongly northwards over the past 50 years. © NASA Read out Creeping displacement: The Great Plains ecosystems have shifted significantly north over the past 50 years, as a study of bird populations reveals.
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What really happened in Tunguska?

Astronomers roll up explosion and possible originators The cause of the Tunguska event in 1908 is still controversial - but the most likely is the explosion of a cosmic bolide in the Earth's atmosphere. © Marharyta Marko / iStock Read out Enigmatic to this day: Astronomers have gained new insights into what caused the enigmatic explosion in the Siberian Tunguska on June 30, 1908.
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Greenland: Tracking down "lost" lakes

Discovery of 56 subglacial lakes clarifies discrepancy between observations and model Under the ice sheet of Greenland are hidden many subglacial lakes - so far they were hidden. © NASA / GSFC, Reto Stockli / Blue Marble Read out But they do exist: So far researchers have been puzzling why there are hardly any subglacial lakes under the ice of Greenland - and so many in the Antarctic.
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How does climate change affect energy consumption?

Power consumption for air conditioning is rising in the tropics, but is declining in Central Europe Climate change brings more hot days and thus cooling needs, at the same time, winter milder and that saves heating energy. What prevails, researchers have now determined. © BrillantEye / iStock Read out It will be expensive: Unchecked climate change could increase global electricity consumption by up to 58 percent over the next 30 years, or even up to 27 percent in the event of moderate warming, according to researchers.
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Sunken palace emerged on the Tigris

Ancient city plant dates back to the time of the mysterious Mittani kingdom View of the Palace of Kemune - meanwhile the complex has disappeared under water again. © University of Tübingen / eScience Center Read out Exciting find thanks to low water: archaeologists have discovered a palace from the Bronze Age on the eastern shore of the Tigris.
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Huge water reservoir under the seabed

Sour water aquifers off the US east coast could be one of the largest in the world Off the northeastern coast of the US, a huge freshwater repository is hidden under the seabed, as geologists have discovered. © Liran Sokolovski / iStock Read out Surprising find: Geologists have discovered one of the largest groundwater reservoirs in the world - off the eastern coast of the US - under the ocean floor of the Atlantic Ocean.
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Himalaya: Ice loss has doubled

"Roof of the World" has lost a good quarter of its glacial ice since 1975 The glaciers of the Himalayas have already lost 28 percent of their ice since 1975, here is a view of the Nup glacier near Mount Everest. © Joshua Maurer Read out Rapid wastage: The glaciers of the Himalayas have lost a good quarter of their ice since 1975.
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Hittite: Rock temple as observatory?

World Heritage Site in Asia Minor could have served as a solar and lunar calendar The 3, 230-year-old Hittite sanctuary Yazilikaya could have served as an astronomical observatory - for example, to mark the solstices. © Oliver Bruderer / Luwian Studies Read out Astronomy of the Bronze Age: The Hittites could have used one of their most important temples as an observatory for solar and lunar observation - the Yazilikaya sanctuary in today's Turkey.
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Artificial islands discovered from the Stone Age

"Crannogs" in the Scottish Hebrides are older than Stonehenge This islet in Loch Bhorgastail on the Hebridean island of Lewis was built around 5, 500 years ago from stone blocks and wooden beams. © F. Sturt / Antiquity, CC-by-sa 4.0 Read out Older than Stonehenge: In the Scottish Hebrides, our ancestors constructed artificial islands in lakes and in the sea more than 5, 500 years ago, as archaeologists have discovered.
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Are there two types of blue diamonds?

The largest type IIb diamonds could have been formed in the lithosphere The Hope Diamond is one of the most famous blue diamonds worldwide. But where did he come from? © 350z33 / CC-by-sa 3.0 Read out Treasure from the depths of the earth: According to popular belief, the valuable blue diamonds were said to have been created in particularly great depth.
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CO2 values ​​reach new record level

Measuring station on the Mauna Loa registers the highest annual value of almost 415 ppm for the first time Development of monthly CO2 values ​​until May 2019, measured on the Mauna Loa in Hawaii. © Kevstan / CC-by-sa 3.0 Read out Unbroken trend: carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere continue to rise. In
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