The thing about vaccinating

A dangerous myth sticks stubbornly Read out Since the late 1990s, there is a rumor that the measles-mumps-spleen vaccine (MMR) causes autism. This assumption is proven to be wrong - and yet it sticks stubbornly. But why is the combination vaccine in this context at all first come into disrepute? Blame is a team of scientists around the British doctor Andrew Wakefield, 1998, a sensational study in the prestigious journal "The Lancet" published
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Our heart is trimmed to endurance

Evolutionary adjustments to the pump goose made our ancestors more enduring Our pump organ: perfectly adapted to endurance activities © dr. microbe / istock Read out Very enduring: Our heart has been trimmed to endurance in the course of evolution. As comparisons with chimpanzees reveal, the heart chambers of our pump organ make adjustments for a day-to-day life with moderate-strenuous but time-consuming physical activities.
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On the trail of the causes

Gene changes and environmental factors Read out The brain of people with autism has a lot of special features. Among other things, functional connectivity seems to have changed. Different areas of the brain are linked differently in autistic people than in non-autists, as studies show. Depending on which regions are affected by the developmental dysfunction, this manifests itself in completely different impressions in intelligence, language, movement and behavior
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Krebs becomes number 1 killer in rich countries

Tumors cause cardiovascular disease as the leading cause of death Cancer has replaced cardiovascular disease as the leading cause of death in some countries. © Vitanovski / thinkstock Read out Remarkable change: In rich countries, more people are now dying of cancer than of cardiovascular disease - at least in the age group up to 70, as a study reveals.
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Search for treatment options

Of controversial therapies and potential medications Read out If autism is diagnosed, the search for suitable therapy offers begins. As a rule, the treatment of developmental disability is based on behavioral and therapeutic approaches. An attempt is made to reduce the disruptive and socially inappropriate behaviors and to strengthen the social and communicative abilities of those affected
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Does testosterone affect empathy?

Study contradicts theory on the influence of sex hormones on the ability to empathize Does the hormone testosterone affect how well we can empathize with others? © Antonio Guillem / istock Read out Alleged side effect: The hormone testosterone is suspected to affect the ability to empathy. In a recent study with male subjects, however, researchers could find no evidence for such a connection.
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An enigmatic epidemic

Will developmental problems become more common? Read out No one knows exactly how many people worldwide are affected by one of the many varieties of autism. Estimates suggest, however, that about one to three percent of children the number of diagnoses seems to have increased significantly in recent years
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Parkinson: Protein clogging stopped

Binding protein prevents growth of diseased alpha-synuclein deposits in the brain Deposits of clotted proteins in the brain are typical for Parkinson's disease. © pixologicstudio / thinkstock Read out Diseased clumps of protein: The deposits of clumped proteins in the brain typical of Parkinson's disease can possibly be combated.
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Retort Brain with active brain waves

Thinking organs bred in the laboratory show activity patterns of functional brain networks Cross section through a brain organoid. Each color corresponds to a different cell type. © Muotri Lab / UCTV Read out Amazingly close to the original: Researchers have for the first time bred brains in the lab that show complex brainwaves - they produce brainwave signals just like a real brain.
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Short sleeper gene discovered

A gene variant in some people reduces the natural need for sleep That some people get along with less sleep than others, could also be due to their genes. © Michael Jung / thinkstock Read out Fit despite little sleep: If someone gets along with extremely little sleep, it may be due to his genes. Because researchers have discovered a gene mutation that apparently shortens the natural need for sleep.
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Tattooing brings heavy metals into the skin

Nickel and chromium are detected from the abrasion of the needles in the tissue When tattooing, heavy metals also enter the skin and lymph nodes - from the needle. © draganab / istock Read out Abrasion Particles: Tattooing allows metal particles to pass deep into the tissue from the needle, a study reveals.
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Sleep Apnea: Pacemaker against respiratory failure

Long-term study proves sustainable treatment benefits in central sleep apnea Patients with central sleep apnea may be helped by a pacemaker nerve pacemaker in the future. © Monkeybusiness / iStock Read out Stimulant for the diaphragm: A pacemaker can effectively help with certain forms of sleep apnea, as demonstrated by a first long-term study of 60 patients.
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Optimists are getting older

Positive attitude to life seems to promote longevity A positive attitude to life not only makes you happy and relaxed - it also makes us seem particularly old. © max-kegfire / istock Read out It depends on the attitude: If you are optimistic about life, you have good chances to grow old. Because researchers have found that optimists live on average longer than more pessimistic set people.
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Danger from microplastics in drinking water?

WHO report gives cautious all-clear, but calls for more research Microplastic is everywhere - even in our drinking water. © pinkomelet / istock Read out Contaminated thirst quencher: According to the current state of knowledge, microplastics in drinking water does not appear to represent a health risk.
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E-cigarettes damage the vessels

Steam interferes with the function of the blood vessel even without nicotine The "vaporization" seems to affect the function of the blood vessels. © patrisyu / thinkstock Read out Bad news for "steamer": The supposedly harmless vapor of e-cigarettes could damage the vascular health.
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Macular degeneration due to traffic emissions?

Heavy pollution with air pollutants could double the risk for AMD Does exposure to air pollutants increase the risk of the retinal disease AMD? © mikkcz / thinkstock Read out Bad for the eyes? Exhaust fumes could promote the development of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). As a study from Taiwan suggests, a heavy exposure to nitrogen dioxide and carbon monoxide at home increases the risk of illness significantly - almost twice.
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Turmeric foam helps wound healing

Natural recipe plus high-tech Ger verhindernst prevent inflammation and scars In the framework of the curcumin-added polymer foam cells find support to build new skin tissue. © Empa Read out Combi foam instead of bandage: a combination of natural recipe and high-tech could heal wounds better in the future.
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Alzheimer's: daytime tiredness as a harbinger?

Tau proteins destroy vital brain regions early in the morning Tired all day? Perhaps a beginning Alzheimer's disease is behind it. © peepo / istock Read out Drowsiness as a warning sign: pronounced daytime tiredness could be the sign of an onset of Alzheimer's disease. As a study suggests, even in the early stages of dementia, important regions of the brain are attacked for alertness.
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Virtual reality relieves pain

VR therapy could help hospital patients with severe pain VR technologies can not only entertain - but also relieve pain. © Sasha Suzi / thinkstock Read out Instead of painkillers? VR technologies apparently help even in severe pain. As a study suggests, immersion in virtual worlds significantly relieves the pain patient's discomfort - and works better than other distraction measures.
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IARC: night work "probably carcinogenic

WHO experts classify night shift work as possible cancer outbreaks Nocturnal shifts put our internal clock out of tune - and could cause cancer. © Ranta images / istock Read out Nocturnal work as a health hazard: night shift work not only upsets our biorhythm, the constant work against the internal clock is probably also carcinogenic.
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